Ten of Swords

I guess Drama is just what I associate with the Ten of Swords, because I’m reminded of it again while listening to Great Expectations, by Charles Dickens.

And at some point I”m going to have to explore why there are so many swords in Great Expectations. So far – swords cards are all I”m reminded of. No other suits. Just swords. And I’ve got another post coming on a Nine of Swords connection now too!

In this scene Pip’s sister is working her way up into a hysteria, and according to Pip it’s VERY calculated the entire way through. Having been in similar situations, I will defend her and say it’s more likely she’s NOT as in control  of herself as Pip  thinks, and most likely is standing in the back of her own head, helpless to stop the momentum. In any case, still a decent example of drama for it’s own sake. 

(spacing / paragraph length differences and italics are my own to highlight the text)        

***

Taken from Chapter 15 of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens:

My sister had been standing silent in the yard, within hearing – she was a most unscrupulous spy and listener – and she instantly looked in at one of the windows.

‘Like you, you fool!’ said she to Joe, ‘giving holidays to great idle hulkers like that. You are a rich man, upon my life, to waste wages in that way. I wish I was his master!’

‘You’d be everybody’s master, if you durst,’ retorted Orlick, with an ill-favoured grin.

(“Let her alone,’ said Joe.)

‘I’d be a match for all noodles and all rogues,’ returned my sister, beginning to work herself into a mighty rage. ‘And I couldn’t be a match for the noodles, without being a match for your master, who’s the dunder-headed king of the noodles. And I couldn’t be a match for the rogues, without being a match for you, who are the blackest-looking and the worst rogue between this and France. Now!’

‘You’re a foul shrew, Mother Gargery, growled the journeyman. ‘If that makes a judge of  rogues, you ought to be a good’un.’

(“Let her alone, will you?’ said Joe.)

‘What did you say?’ cried my sister, beginning to scream. ‘What did you say? What did that fellow Orlick say to me, Pip? What did he call me, with my husband standing by? O! O! O!’ Each of these exclamations was a shriek; and I must remark of my sister, what is equally true of all the violent women I have ever seen, that passion was no excuse for her, because it is undeniable that instead of lapsing into passion, she consciously and deliberately took extraordinary pains to force herself into it, and became blindly furious by regular stages; ‘what was the name he gave me before the base man who swore to defend me? O! Hold me! O!’

‘Ah-h-h!’ growled the journeyman, between his teeth, ‘I’d hold you, if you was my wife. I’d hold you under the pump, and choke it out of you.’

(“I tell you, let her alone,’ said Joe.)

‘Oh! To hear him!’ cried my sister, with a clap of her hands and a scream together -which was her next stage. ‘To hear the names he’s giving me! That Orlick! In my own house! Me, a married woman! With my husband standing by! O! O!’ Here my sister, after a fit of clappings and screamings, beat her hands upon her bosom and upon her knees, and threw her cap off, and pulled her hair down – which were the last stages on her road to frenzy. Being by this time a perfect Fury and a complete success, she made a dash at
the door, which I had fortunately locked.

What could the wretched Joe do now, after his disregarded parenthetical interruptions, but stand up to his journeyman, and ask him what he meant by interfering betwixt himself and Mrs. Joe; and further whether he was man enough to come on? Old Orlick felt that the situation admitted of nothing less than coming on, and was on his defense
straightway; so, without so much as pulling off their singed and burnt aprons, they went at one another, like two giants. But, if any man in that neighbourhood could stand up long against Joe, I never saw the man. Orlick, as if he had been of no more account than the pale young gentleman, was very soon among the coal-dust, and in no hurry to come out of it. Then, Joe unlocked the door and picked up my sister, who had dropped insensible at the window (but who had seen the fight first, I think), and who was carried into the house and laid down, and who was recommended to revive, and would do nothing but struggle and clench her hands in Joe’s hair. Then, came that singular calm and silence which succeed all uproars; and then, with the vague sensation which I have always connected with such a lull – namely, that it was Sunday, and somebody was dead – I went up-stairs to dress myself.

When I came down again, I found Joe and Orlick sweeping up, without any other traces of discomposure than a slit in one of Orlick’s nostrils, which was neither expressive nor ornamental. A pot of beer had appeared from the Jolly Bargemen, and they were sharing it by turns in a peaceable manner. The lull had a sedative and philosophical influence on Joe, who followed me out into the road to say, as a parting observation that might do me good, ‘On the Rampage, Pip, and off the Rampage, Pip – such is Life!’

***

10 swords.png

 

 

 

Seven of Swords

When I started learning to read Tarot, it was with the Sacred Circle deck by Anna Franklin and Paul Mason, and the primary keyword they chose to go with the card is

“Diplomacy.”

Franklin and Mason advise tact and diplomacy in dealing with situations if this card appears. In essence, to choose your words wisely in order to convey the illusion you wish to be believed. This scene from the novel Great Expectations by Charles Dickens reminds me of the Seven of Swords because it’s like Diplomacy Run Amuck!

Poor Joe Gargery is out of his element in this scene, and copes the only way he knows how, which is to fling every high sounding word and phrase he can think of around to use a lot of words to say very little real content. Kind of like the Dark Side of Writing. Joe is also trying to hide that he feels inadequate to the task at hand … like an animal puffing itself up to appear larger than it really is when it’s threatened. That’s where the tie to the traditional meaning of this card is – to

Deception

and

Acting Strategically.

***

And now for the Seen of Swords scene:

7 swords sacred circle.jpg
Sacred Circle Tarot by Anna Franklin and Paul Mason

‘You are the husband,’ repeated Miss Havisham, ‘of the sister of this boy?’

It was very aggravating; but, throughout the interview Joe persisted in addressing Me instead of Miss Havisham.

‘Which I meantersay, Pip,’ Joe now observed in a manner that was at once expressive of forcible argumentation, strict confidence, and great politeness, ‘as I hup and married your sister, and I were at the time what you might call (if you was anyways inclined) a single man.’

‘Well!’ said Miss Havisham. ‘And you have reared the boy, with the intention of taking him for your apprentice; is that so, Mr. Gargery?’

‘You know, Pip,’ replied Joe, ‘as you and me were ever friends, and it were looked for’ard to betwixt us, as being calc’lated to lead to larks. Not but what, Pip, if you had ever
made objections to the business – such as its being open to black and sut, or such-like – not but what they would have been attended to, don’t you see?’

‘Has the boy,’ said Miss Havisham, ‘ever made any objection? Does he like the trade?’

‘Which it is well beknown to yourself, Pip,’ returned Joe, strengthening his former mixture of argumentation, confidence, and politeness, ‘that it were the wish of your own
hart.’ (I saw the idea suddenly break upon him that he would adapt his epitaph to the occasion, before he went on to say) ‘And there weren’t no objection on your part, and
Pip it were the great wish of your heart!’

It was quite in vain for me to endeavour to make him sensible that he ought to speak to Miss Havisham. The more I made faces and gestures to him to do it, the more confidential, argumentative, and polite, he persisted in being to Me.

‘Have you brought his indentures with you?’ asked Miss Havisham.

‘Well, Pip, you know,’ replied Joe, as if that were a little unreasonable, ‘you yourself see me put ‘em in my ‘at, and therefore you know as they are here.’ With which he took them out, and gave them, not to Miss Havisham, but to me.  I am afraid I was ashamed of the dear good fellow – I know I was ashamed of him – when I saw that Estella stood at the back of Miss Havisham’s chair, and that her eyes laughed mischievously. I took the indentures out of his hand and gave them to Miss Havisham.

‘You expected,’ said Miss Havisham, as she looked them over, ‘no premium with the boy?’

‘Joe!’ I remonstrated; for he made no reply at all. ‘Why don’t you answer—‘

‘Pip,’ returned Joe, cutting me short as if he were hurt, ‘which I meantersay that were not a question requiring a answer betwixt yourself and me, and which you know the answer to be full well No. You know it to be No, Pip, and wherefore should I say it?’

Miss Havisham glanced at him as if she understood what he really was, better than I had thought possible, seeing what he was there; and took up a little bag from the table beside her.

joe and miss h.jpeg
F.A. Fraser – An illustration for the Household Edition of Dickens’s Great Expectations (p. 48). Scanned image and text by Philip V. Allingham

‘Pip has earned a premium here,’ she said, ‘and here it is. There are five-and-twenty guineas in this bag. Give it to your master, Pip.’

As if he were absolutely out of his mind with the wonder awakened in him by her strange figure and the strange room, Joe, even at this pass, persisted in addressing me.

‘This is wery liberal on your part, Pip,’ said Joe, ‘and it is as such received and grateful welcome, though never looked for, far nor near nor nowheres. And now, old chap,’ said Joe, conveying to me a sensation, first of burning and then of freezing, for I felt as if that familiar expression were applied to Miss Havisham; ‘and now, old chap, may we do our duty! May you and me do our duty, both on us by one and another, and by them which your liberal present – have – conweyed – to be – for the satisfaction of mind – of – them
as never—’ here Joe showed that he felt he had fallen into frightful difficulties, until he triumphantly rescued himself with the words, ‘and from myself far be it!’ These words had such a round and convincing sound for him that he said them twice.

  • taken from Chapter 13 of Great Expectations

***

To learn more about the traditional meanings of the Seven of Swords, click here: www.biddytarot.com.

 

Five of Swords

from Great Expectations  by Charles Dickens
(italics mine)

***

When I had exhausted the garden, and a greenhouse with nothing in it but a fallen-down grape-vine and some bottles, I found myself in the dismal corner upon which I had looked out of the window. Never questioning for a moment that the house was now empty, I looked in at another window, and found myself, to my great surprise, exchanging a broad stare with a pale young gentleman with red eyelids and light hair.

This pale young gentleman quickly disappeared, and re-appeared beside me. He had been at his books when I had found myself staring at him, and I now saw that he was
inky.

‘Halloa!’ said he, ‘young fellow!’

Halloa being a general observation which I had usually observed to be best answered by itself, I said, ‘Halloa!’ politely omitting young fellow.

‘Who let you in?’ said he.

‘Miss Estella.’

‘Who gave you leave to prowl about?’

‘Miss Estella.’

‘Come and fight,’ said the pale young gentleman.

What could I do but follow him? I have often asked myself the question since: but, what else could I do? His manner was so final and I was so astonished, that I followed where  he led, as if I had been under a spell.

‘Stop a minute, though,’ he said, wheeling round before we had gone many paces. ‘I ought to give you a reason for fighting, too. There it is!’ In a most irritating manner he instantly slapped his hands against one another, daintily flung one of his legs up behind him, pulled my hair, slapped his hands again, dipped his head, and butted it into my stomach.

The bull-like proceeding last mentioned, besides that it was unquestionably to be  regarded in the light of a liberty, was particularly disagreeable just after bread and meat.
I therefore hit out at him and was going to hit out again, when he said, ‘Aha! Would you?’ and began dancing backwards and forwards in a manner quite unparalleled within my limited experience.

‘Laws of the game!’ said he. Here, he skipped from his left leg on to his right. ‘Regular rules!’ Here, he skipped from his right leg on to his left. ‘Come to the ground, and go through the preliminaries!’ Here, he dodged backwards and forwards, and did all sorts of things while I looked helplessly at him.

I was secretly afraid of him when I saw him so dexterous; but, I felt morally and physically convinced that his light head of hair could have had no business in the pit of my stomach, and that I had a right to consider it irrelevant when so obtruded on my attention. Therefore, I followed him without a word, to a retired nook of the garden, formed by the junction of two walls and screened by some rubbish. On his asking me if I was satisfied with the ground, and on my replying Yes, he begged my leave to absent himself for a moment, and quickly returned with a bottle of water and a sponge dipped in vinegar. ‘Available for both,’ he said, placing these against the wall. And then fell to pulling off, not only his jacket and waistcoat, but his shirt too, in a manner
at once light-hearted, businesslike, and bloodthirsty.

Although he did not look very healthy – having pimples on his face, and a breaking out at his mouth – these dreadful preparations quite appalled me. I judged him to be about my own age, but he was much taller, and he had a way of spinning himself about that was full of appearance. For the rest, he was a young gentleman in a grey suit (when not denuded for battle), with his elbows, knees, wrists, and heels, considerably in advance of the rest of him as to development.

fight.jpeg
taken from www.study.com

My heart failed me when I saw him squaring at me with every demonstration of mechanical nicety, and eyeing my anatomy as if he were minutely choosing his bone. I never have been so surprised in my life, as I was when I let out the first blow, and saw him lying on his back, looking up at me with a bloody nose and his face exceedingly fore-shortened.

But, he was on his feet directly, and after sponging himself with a great show of dexterity began squaring again. The second greatest surprise I have ever had in my life was
seeing him on his back again, looking up at me out of a black eye.

His spirit inspired me with great respect. He seemed to have no strength, and he never once hit me hard, and he was always knocked down; but, he would be up again in a moment, sponging himself or drinking out of the waterbottle, with the greatest satisfaction in seconding himself according to form, and then came at me with an air and a show that made me believe he really was going to do for me at last. He got heavily bruised, for I am sorry to record that the more I hit him, the harder I hit him; but, he came up again and again and again, until at last he got a bad fall with the back of his head against the wall. Even after that crisis in our affairs, he got up and turned round and round confusedly a few times, not knowing where I was; but finally went on his knees to his sponge and threw it up: at the same time panting out, ‘That means you have won.’

He seemed so brave and innocent, that although I had not proposed the contest I felt but a gloomy satisfaction in my victory. Indeed, I go so far as to hope that I regarded myself while dressing, as a species of savage young wolf, or other wild beast. However, I got dressed, darkly wiping my sanguinary face at intervals, and I said, ‘Can I help you?’
and he said ‘No thankee,’ and I said ‘Good afternoon,’ and he said ‘Same to you.’

***

Traditional Five of Swords meanings  at www.biddytarot.com.

 

Works Cited

Dickens, Charles. Great Expectations. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1942. Print.

Waite, Arthur E.. “Radiant Rider-Waite Tarot Deck.” Smith, Pamela C., Designer,
(Reissued in collaboration with Miss Sybil Waite and Rider & Company, London),
U.S. Games Systems, Inc., 2003, Stamford, CN.

 

Horses in the Tarot (Rider Waite)

Inspired by the Knight of Wands exploration, I went through the entire Rider Waite deck and pulled out the cards featuring horses that are in addition to the four Knights.

I found three. Interestingly, all the horses have riders and all the pairs are traveling in the same direction, to the right (and future?). Two are Major Arcana, one is Minor. The Minor Arcana card was of the Wands suit.  ALL the horses are WHITE. There is an object in the shape of an orb and in similar placement in all three cards: the sun in the Sun card, the laurel wreath in the Six of Wands, and … what is apparently the White Rose of the House of York, in the Death card.

Also interesting, is the fact that these three could easily symbolize the three major phases of our biological life span: Childhood, Adulthood, and Older Age. 

Lined up numerically, they would be:

Since the originators of the Tarot cards didn’t do anything by accident, this is interesting to explore as well. The numbers are 6, 13, and 19. If looked at still as the three major phases of biological lifespans, the Sun would be in the Older Age and Endings placement. If we think about it, our infancy and childhood really is the beginning of our biological decay – our spirits are eternal but the bodies we incarnate into are not, and they begin dying the minute the leave the womb.

I suppose Death could be feasible in the Adulthood placement too, as it is possible it is meant to remind us that our entire lives are illusions of life, and that as adults, we are in full blown Death phase? Could be.

And the Six of Wands in the Childhood placement. When a child is born, it is generally celebrated and heralded with joy and adulation. That is true. So even though the figure in this card is an adult, the adulation he receives could be said to be reminiscent of the birth of a new baby. So I guess that could make sense.

Horses generally symbolize Freedom, so freedom is a theme that will be found somewhere, somehow in each of these cards, as well as in the cards of the Knights:

Www.pure-spirit.com says that “Although the horse was present in many different cultures, they represent the same concepts of freedom and power.  In some cultures, white horses stand for the balance of wisdom and power.  In others, like Christianity, the white horse is a symbol of death.  The horse is a universal symbol of freedom without restraint, because riding a horse made people feel they could free themselves from their own bindings.  Also linked with riding horses, they are symbols of travel, movement, and desire.”

All seven of these cards do indeed do mark a transition from one sate of being into another. The Six of Wands takes a person from obscurity to acclaim. Death, from one plane of existence to another; the Sun, from darkness to light. And the Knights are all about movement and change within their respective elements and suits.

And finally, its interesting that there are seven of these cards. Seventy-Eight Degrees of Wisdom, by Rachel Pollack separates the Major Arcana into sets of seven with each set representing a phase of enlightenment while on earth.

Could this set of seven cards as a whole also be representative of something important in the experience of a soul?

***

Knight of Swords traditional meanings

Knight of Pentacles traditional meanings

Knight of Cups traditional meanings

Knight of Wands traditional meanings

The Sun traditional meanings

Death traditional meanings

Six of Wands traditional meanings

Drama, Much?

So I”m upstairs on my hands and knees (not as exciting as it first sounds) scrubbing away at the Revenge Pooper’s (a whollllllle OTHER blogpost!) latest “SPOT” on the rug …

And I’m NOT happy about it.

woman cleaning living room table with cloth and spray bottle tired in stress

This is like his 10th non-acccident.

I hate my house, family, pets, and life.

Fuck My Life, btw.

I stop to take a break and text my girlfriend of forty years Tamara Perrin Florea in Ohio.

“Do you ever wonder if maybe we are ghosts and that’s why no matter how much we clean, or how many times we clean the same thing, it never gets clean, ever? It just stays messy? If we are ghosts that would also explain why no one (kids, husbands, pets, whoever you have around you) ever HEARS us too! Maybe we’ve died but just don’t know it because cleaning is all we know and we don’t know how to stop???”

10 swords radiant
Radiant Rider Waite

This, my friends, is the Ten of Swords energy.

The Ten of Swords can be about death and endings, but sometimes it’s just about so much drama, or so much more drama than is necessary.

Please note the TEN swords this person has been stabbed in the back with, as opposed to the ONE that would have done the trick just as easily!

So the next time you’re doing something you despise doing and you feel really, really, sorry for yourself and bitter about doing it?

You’re communing with this Tarot card’s energy!

Disclaimer: no humans were hurt during this blog post, and I felt better the minute I texted my girlfriend. I felt so good I left the rest of the nefarious “spot” for another day, bought some moscato coolers, and called it a day!

***

Ten of Swords traditional meanings

 

You don’t need to teach Kids, Kids will teach you-Be prepared ! — Success Inspirers’ World

Originally posted on With Nature-By Tanusri Sen: This is the real picture captured recently. This is the effect of using TV, Mobile phones. Though there are many bad effects, I have reflected here good effect of Advanced Technology ! It is amazing, isn’t it ? I have talked with these kids of 5-6 years old.…

via You don’t need to teach Kids, Kids will teach you-Be prepared ! — Success Inspirers’ World

The Ten of Cups: My Take

6/18/18 Notes from Sacred Circle 10 of Cups:

ten cups sacred circle

 

  • Appreciate what is being given.
  • Tipping point of some kind.
  • Shoot for the ideal.
  • Harvest is right here. But there is still information to be benefited from if willing to       travel the distance to get to it.
  • Also harvest yet to be picked.
  • FRUIT: Fruit are symbolic of fertility and ideas and plans coming to fruition (Biddy Tarot Symbolism pdf).
  • LEAVES: Leaves symbolize growth and vitality (Biddy Tarot Symbolism pdf).
  • RAINBOW: The rainbow is a sign of Universal protection, happiness and ideal states
    of being (Biddy Tarot Symbolism pdf).
  • In a garden. What is garden symbolism?
    GARDENS:
    Gardens offer the ability to enjoy the beauty of nature in peace and
    comfort. Gardens are also safe and relatively private, providing space for
    retreat, relaxation and contemplation.
    Gardens represent the fact that people have the power not only to
    control nature, but also to improve it through nurturing and caring
    for the earth. Think of a beautifully landscaped garden that is both
    aesthetically pleasing and a sustainable food source.
    Gardens are also living metaphors of perfection. They represent
    cultivation and growth, all leading towards a natural paradise of
    perfection. (Biddy Tarot Symbolism pdf)

 

Share your own insights

in the comments below!

 

* * * 

Fiery K. Tarot is currently running an $11 Summer Sale on Tarot Guidance and Readings; email fiery.kaleidoscope@gmail.com or text 410.490.6357 to order your reading, and hone in on the heart of any decision, crossroads, or question!

* * * 

 

chalice blue THE ONE

 

(Feature photo just desktop wallpaper from the site: ognature.com.)

(In an effort to maximize my time and energy in the Biddy Tarot Certification Course, I’ve decided to start journaling (which is blogging for me) about the weekly cards from which I pull inspiration and guidance towards my monthly goals. This is not authoritative information, just my personal notes.)

This week’s card is the Ten of Cups.

ten cups sacred circle

When I pulled this card a month ago, when I was doing my lookahead to the weeks in the month of May, I was using my usual deck, the Sacred Circle Tarot, by Anna Franklin and Paul Mason.

I had written in my notes, “Work is done. Crop is to be enjoyed.”

chalice blue THE ONE.jpg

Numerical symbolism
End of a cycle and simultaneous renewal. In the realms of numerology, 10 also reduces down to 1 (1+0=1). And so, can also symbolize all the things that the number “1” does. (Biddy Tarot Numerology Chart) Anthony Louis phrases 10 as being “a transition point from one cycle to another . . . a number of completion and final ending. (Tarot Plain and Simple,)”

Astrological symbolism ..which planet rules the card…
Golden dawn says mars/pisces (To me, Mars is a Fire planet, so I don’t get that, but I don’t much like Golden Dawn anyway?)
Water : cancer, scorpio, pisces
Hindu decans – pisces scorpio (no clue what that (decans) is)
(Tarot Plain and Simple, by Anthony Louis)

Elements symbolism
water

Season and direction correspondence
Astrologically, The suit of Cups corresponds with the direction of North and the season of Summer.

The pagan traditions that I am familiar with cite Water (the cups) as corresponding with the direction West and so the season of Autumn.

I’m sure there are other traditions and cultures with other correspondences, but Autumn and West is what I work with. I can’t even wrap my head around North and Summer but – astrology is an ancient science so I’m sure they are more correct than we are? Either way – everyone chooses what makes sense to them and that’s what you work with.

6/18/18 Note: Water and the Cups and the West being correlated with Summer makes more sense to me now, with Swords ruling Autumn, Wands ruling Spring, and Pentacles ruling Winter, but I still personally work with Swords /Spring, Wands/Summer, Cups/Fall, and Pentacles/Winter, as I was taught that the directions follow East/Spring, South/Summer, West/Autumn, and North/Winter.  

Major Arcana card
The Wheel of Fortune, or as my deck names it, simply The Wheel.

chalice blue THE ONE

The AnnaFranklin.webplus.net interprets their Ten of Cups as:

Key word: reward

The ten cups of this card are full with the various good things of the harvest, the culmination of all the efforts of the farming year.  They represent achievements of various kinds. The fruits depicted all have various symbolic meanings and energies, and play their part in our harvest celebrations.

Divinatory Meanings:

You are now reaping the rewards of all your efforts. It is a time of great happiness within the family and you will experience the joy of true friendships. This situation has firm foundations and will be long lasting.

Reverse Meanings:

Your well ordered environment will be disrupted in an extreme fashion, perhaps by the birth of a child or by a troublesome teenager. This card heralds family quarrels and the loss of friendships.

Some Key Words:
Peace, joy, happiness, contentment, love, family life, a good reputation, honor, virtue, harmony, a happy hearth.


chalice blue THE ONE

 

I am now working with the Radiant Rider-Waite deck –

in that deck, the card looks like this:

Radiant10Cups.jpg

chalice blue THE ONE

Some interesting sites:

http://newpathstarot.com/index.php/card-by-card-ten-of-cups/  (this is an AMAZING page)

http://annafranklin.webplus.net/page69.html

chalice blue THE ONE

Share your own insights

in the comments below!

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